Web Standards

I linked to the Boagworld web site in my last post, about IE7. I discovered the site and its owner Paul Boag a few weeks ago, and he’s totally changed the way I think about designing websites. I, like many others, have been using table-based designs since we started playing with HTML about 100 years ago. While I’m still not 100% convinced that tables are wrong for layout, I have wholly embraced CSS design and web standards. With tables, you place all the different elements of a website, like navigation, main content, search etc in table cells within the html and usually style it within the html. With web standards, you create flat html (xhtml) with no styling, divided into <div></div> and other tags; tags that are meant for holding the elements of a website — and then style the elements in a separate “style” file or files. Anyone who’s done any website creation anytime in the last 5 years has at least seen CSS or cascading style sheets and like me, you might have even used CSS without realizing you were doing so.

CSS is the style part of a tag.

<a href=”http://www.domain.com&#8221; style=”font-size: 12px; font-weight:bold”>link</a>

The point of web standards, though is to remove all of the styling from the HTML file, and place it in a seperate CSS file. You can then link a tag in the html to the CSS like this:

<a href=”http://www.domain.com&#8221; class=”important-link”>link</a>

I really like the idea of separating the page elements from the style. It makes for much cleaner and easier reading html files and makes changing the look of your website, minor or major, so much easier. For example, when you look at the html file for a web standards based website, the menu items might look like this:

<ul>
<li>menu item</li>
<li>menu item</li>
<li>menu item</li>
<li>menu item</li>
<li>menu item</li>
</ul>

Which you’d think would give you a straight, vertical bulleted list, but with styling in the css file, you can do any number of things — like laying it out horizontally and adding borders and background colors and borders. You can also tell the browser to change text color or background color when the mouse moves over the menu item.

I’ve known about and have on occasion used CSS, but thanks to Paul Boag’s insistence, I have now completely moved away from tables and putting the style in the html. My HTML and style are completely separate and I consider it a challenge to myself, to make sure it stays that way. I’ve got much more to say about this, but thus post is getting long — so I’ll save it for another time.

How did I learn XHTML and CSS and the concept of web standards. W3schools, of course.

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Published in: on July 5, 2006 at 2:20 pm  Leave a Comment  

IE7 & Crashes

Internet Explorer7 (IE7) is out in beta (#3) and I like the new look and feel. I like the way cleartext makes all the fonts look really cool. I design websites in my spare time, so I also like the way it conforms to web standards (CSS and XHTML.) But there’s one little thing that bugs me: it crashes all the time. OK, so that’s a pretty big thing, I guess.

It’s strange, but I also have Maxthon installed on my computer, which uses the IE engine, and it works fine. It amost never crashes, or more precisely, freezes, cause that’s what happens to IE7. I’ll be in the middle of something and all of a sudden, my browser is frozen and I can’t close it without doing the 3-finger salute. I’ve googled it, and have never found anyone else with this problem. Maybe it’s just the exact combination of MY software and MY hardware that’s doing it, and no one else is affected, but I don’t think that’s the case.

IE7 is supposed to come out for real sometime in the next few months, and I hear it might just be a critical update, meaning it downloads automatically for just about everyone. If everyone (or a significant number of people ) start(s ) crashing all of a sudden, there’s gonna be a lot of unhappy people.

Am I the only one concerned about this? Am I the only who’s blogging about this problem? Am I the only one HAVING this problem.

Published in: on July 4, 2006 at 2:25 pm  Comments (1)